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Answering Lincoln's Call

Independent Press Award – Distinguished Favorite - 2023

Big Book Award – Distinguished Favorite - 2023

Answering Lincoln’s Call: War in America is a true story originally told in the same 180 letters written by Lieutenant Thomas S. Armstrong about his experiences in the Civil War that were the basis for Seeing the Elephant.
 

Author T.W. Harvey has used those letters and other primary and secondary research to tell the story that leads up to the one in Seeing the Elephant. He describes the emotional difficulties Armstrong and his friends went through in making the decision to go to war, away from their everyday lives in Muskingum County, Ohio. And then, once they made the decision to enlist, they were subjected to life in the camp of the 78th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

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From Vicksburg to Bennett Place

From Vicksburg to Bennett Place is also a true story based on the 70 letters written by Captain George Washington Porter about his experiences in the Civil War that are entirely different than Seeing the Elephant. 

 

Author T.W. Harvey has used those letters and other primary and secondary research as Captain Porter was the aide-de-camp to Brigadier General Mortimer Leggett, assisting the general as the Army of Tennessee moved south, then east, and finally north to the surrender of Confederate General Joseph Johnston at Bennett Place in North Carolina two weeks after Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant, effectively ending the Civil War.

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Seeing the Elephant

Readers Favorite 5 Star Review - 2019

Big Book Award – Distinguished Favorite - 2022

Independent Press Award – Distinguished Favorite - 2023

Seeing the Elephant: One Man’s Return to the Horrors of the Civil War is a true story originally told in 180 letters written by Lieutenant Thomas S. Armstrong of the 122nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry about his experiences in the Civil War. 

 

Author T.W. Harvey has used those letters and other primary and secondary research to tell of those experiences from Armstrong’s decision to fight for his country and what the Union stood for; to being discharged after the Battle of Shiloh due to illness; to the decision to re-enlist, knowing that he will see the horror of battle once again and the possibility of his own death; to being captured at the conclusion of the Second Battle of Winchester; to enduring the horrible conditions of prison life; to escape from Libby Prison, only to be recaptured; to being paroled and marching in the procession at the funeral of Abraham Lincoln. 

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